Our Father In Heaven

Jesus taught his disciples to address their prayers to their Father in heaven. The implications of this are profound. Below is a copy of a recent sermon where I attempted to unpack at least some of these implications. It was the second sermon in a series on The Lord’s Prayer. Audio of all my sermons may be found at Trinity’s website.


Luke 11:1-4

Our Father In Heaven

Scripture Reading and Prayer

Turn with me in your Bibles to Luke 11. Continue reading

Lord, Teach Us To Pray

In Luke 11:1, the disciples ask Jesus to teach them how to pray. After watching Jesus pray, the disciples knew their own prayer lives were not what they could be or should be. They longed to know how to pray as Jesus prayed. And so they asked. In response to their request, Jesus gave them what we normally call “The Lord’s Prayer.” This strongly suggests that Jesus thought their use of and meditation upon this prayer would teach them how to pray. I trust it will do the same for us today.

Below is a copy of my manuscript for the first sermon in a series of The Lord’s Prayer. The audio of the sermon may be found at Trinity’s website.


Luke 11:1-4

Lord, Teach Us To Pray

Scripture Reading and Prayer

  1. Turn with me in your Bibles to Luke 11. Our Scripture reading this morning is Luke 11:1-4. If you do not have a Bible with you this morning, you should be able to find one under one of the chairs in front of you. You will find Luke 11:1 on page 869 in the pew Bibles.
  2. And, if you have found Luke 11:1-4, you will see that they are Jesus’ presentation of the so-called Lord’s Prayer to his disciples. The disciples ask Jesus to teach them how to pray, and in response Jesus gives them this prayer. Obviously, then, Jesus not only intends this prayer to be prayed, he intends it to be studied. Jesus intends this prayer to teach his disciples how to pray.
  3. And, it is for that reason, we are going to slow down and take our time studying this prayer. I think most of us appreciate the disciples’ question. We struggle with prayer. Prayer exposes our incompetency, our inability. And we long for someone to show us, to teach us, how to pray because we know we don’t yet get it, we haven’t yet mastered it. We know ourselves to be novices at best when it comes to prayer. And so, for that reason, we are going to take our time studying these verses, striving to understand them, to apply them, to master them.
  4. But, before we begin, let’s pray and ask God to use his Word this morning, and over the course of the next several weeks, to teach us, not only about prayer, but how to pray…
  5. Luke 11:1-4. Listen to this. This is the very Word of God…
  6. That is the reading of God’s Word.

Continue reading

Hallowed Be Your Name

On October 11, I began a series of sermons on the Lord’s prayer. The first sermon in the series addressed the nature and purpose of prayer. Two Sundays ago, we considered the significance of addressing our prayers to our Father in heaven. This past Sunday, our focus was on the first petition: “Hallowed be your name.” We saw that this petition comes first, not only because the glory of God’s name is to be our first priority, but also because concern for his name is to be the fountain or source of every other petition we bring to our Father in prayer. Below you will find a copy of the manuscript. The audio may be found at Trinity’s website.


Luke 11:1-4

Hallowed Be Your Name

Continue reading